Homework Help

Homework Help! Without the Home Hassle

Homework Help Ending Home Hassle

Research after research has shown that parental involvement is the key to how successful your child will be at school. But, how much help is too much and when kids, dawdle, do sloppy work, procrastinate or otherwise avoid the inevitable? What’s a parent to do?

Homework Help
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In some families getting homework done can turn into a major event which can go on for hours and cause tension for everyone in the household. But, it doesn’t have to be this way. Only a reasonable amount of time should be spent on homework. (Check with your school to see if they have an official homework policy.) If homework assignments seem to be taking an outrageous amount of time or if your child is struggling, make an appointment with the teacher.

Schedule one early in the school year and discuss the nature of the approach to reading, math, spelling and other topics your child will study. Then aim to establish a good rapport with your child’s teacher and touch base when you have any concerns. Don’t wait for problems to escalate. Make a point of discussing things at the first sign of trouble.

Let your child know what your personal expectations are regarding his homework and make it clear that homework is a priority. Many families are so over-extended with activities there is very little time in an evening to devote to schoolwork. If you fall into this category maybe NOW is the time to re-examine your child’s activity load, not to mention, your own commitments. Something may have to give. homework help

Homework Help
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As for how much you should actually help your child with his homework – it’s really a personal decision. Sometimes, a little bit of help goes a long way if your child is stuck on a question or is having difficulty understanding a concept. But, if your child thinks you’re going to do it for them, you’re headed for trouble. Furthermore, you’re setting your child up for failure since you can’t be in the classroom looking over his shoulder. Instead, you need to assist your child in dealing with the ‘real’ world at school. back-to-school comes back-to-homework Related Today.com

Develop a positive attitude about helping. Attempt to understand and respect your child’s individual learning style. There is no right or wrong way to learn.

Show interest in what your child is learning. You might even want to turn the tables a little bit and let your child become your teacher at home. Have him read from his homework and explain to you about what they have learned or are in the middle of studying.

Being nearby when your child is doing homework is an excellent opportunity for parents to be part of their kid’s academic world.

The use of a kitchen timer is a great motivator for kids who have difficulty staying on task. Encourage your child to see how much they can get done in certain increments of time. As your child moves up in grades, the time increments should be increased.

Messy work is unacceptable. If your child rushes through his homework and has been careless, encourage pride. Make it known that as a family you take pride in doing your best and feeling proud of your accomplishments. Explain you want him to be proud of his work. Encourage your child to self-monitor his work. It only takes a few extra minutes to check over the work and self-correct as needed.

If appropriate, cite a story about your own study experiences as a child. You can teach your child to be self-reliant and at the same time explain to him that from time to time everyone struggles with schoolwork – and gets through it.

 If you run into a situation where the assignment is misunderstood, repeat the directions and then have him complete the task. If that doesn’t work, use one of the problems as an example and work through it with together. Be sure to commend your child for his effort, good work, and independence. Nothing builds self-esteem like praise from parents.

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